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News Details - CRC Austin

12/14/2010
News Archive

Head Line CRC Weathers the Blizzard of 2010

Every day our members trust Cooperative Response Center, Inc. to serve the needs of their business. Millions of member-consumers rely on CRC’s ability to answer customer contact and central station calls around the clock, but a recent weather event put CRC to the true test.

In the early morning hours of December 11, 2010, a blizzard roared into southern Minnesota creating dangerous driving conditions and reduced visibility. As the storm progressed, it was clear this would be one for the record books. Snow plows were ordered off the roads, highways were shut down, and citizens were encouraged to stay put or risk being stranded in the deadly weather.

As CRC’s Austin Center coped with six foot snow drifts and deadly wind chills, CRC employees at its center in Dunlap, Tennessee, found themselves in the midst of their own winter storm.
Employees braved violent winds and treacherous conditions, often becoming stranded at CRC.

After Austin Contact Center Supervisor Bruce Cather found himself in that predicament, he decided there was nothing more he could do than just keep on working. “The time went fast during all of those hours because I was busy taking calls,” said Bruce. “When you’re on call, you do what you have to do.” Twenty-six hours later, Bruce finally made it home, but road conditions were still terrible.

Fellow Dunlap employee Candace Purkiss experienced the same dilemma. After finding herself stranded at CRC’s Dunlap office, she decided to spend it continuing to work hard for our members.

According to the Minnesota Highway Patrol, the blizzard created transportation challenges the area had not seen for 19 years, causing two snow plows and numerous cars to slide off the road. The roof of the Metrodome, home to the Minnesota Vikings, also collapsed during the storm and area airports completely shut down the entire weekend. In Dunlap, numerous roads were considered impassable.

The Blizzard of 2010, affectionately named “Snowmageddon,” ranks as the fifth biggest snowfall on record with parts of Minnesota receiving in upwards of 20 inches of snow.